Accident Scene Management / Road Guardians
(262) 706-3278
Accident Scene Management / Road Guardians
(262) 706-3278

BE PREPARED

written by Wild Prairie HOG Safety Officer – John Garley

Here are two realities regarding our interest in motorcycling: a few motorcycles crash, and motorcyclists are often the first people to arrive on the scene of a motorcycle crash.  This is not coincidence, magic, luck or divine intervention; we simply prefer to ride on roads that meander away from towns and involve curves, hills, water, trees, and of course deer (Mother Nature’s Suicide Terrorists).  People in cars, on the other hand, are generally on highways or main roads to efficiently get from Point A to Point B while   motorcyclists are out sightseeing.  So even though motorcycles are in the minority, we may be the primary vehicle on back roads.  Now the issue is: what to do if, and when, we encounter a motorcycle crash scene. Boy Scout or not, BE PREPARED is good advice for everyone.

Vicki Sanfelipo is a biker from Milwaukee and she is a Registered Nurse.  As such she would hear other cyclists around her say; Oh good, Vicki’s here.  Just in case there is an accident, she’ll know what to do.  Vicki thought; well yes, if we come across an accident inside a clean building, that has a pharmacy, radiology, limitless medical supplies, an operating room or two, and lots of doctors and nurses near-by, I’ll know just what to do!   Vicki’s medical training did little to prepare her to respond to a motorcycle crash two miles from the middle of nowhere and in the ditch.  As a result, she developed Accident Scene Management Inc. (ASM) courses to prepare bikers to be of maximum usefulness in those critical first 5-20 minutes.

Every person I know who has taken this training has spoken highly of ASM.  Unlike a Red Cross First Aid class or CPR training, Accident Scene Management was created by bikers and for bikers.  It all applies to us and our specific situation.  Where else will you be instructed in the safest way to remove a full-face helmet from a biker who is not breathing?  ASM training revolves around P.A.C.T. which stands for Prevent further injury, Access the situation, Contact help, and Treat the injured.  ASM Basic training involves a full day (usually a Saturday) and covers techniques and priorities as they pertain to Prevent – Access – Contact – Treat.  Advanced training on the second day (usually a Sunday) largely focuses on Treatment.  Basic training is not ASM Lite or elemental in nature, ASM Basic provides a great deal of very useful knowledge and preparation so you can concentrate on the most important things a person should do while waiting for professional help to arrive.

I strongly encourage riders of all brands to sign up for ASM training.  Chances are that ASM classes are only offered once a year in your area, so jump at the chance to sign-up.   If you need Continuing Education, each day of ASM training provides 6.0 CEs.

As a Certified Road Guardian, I wish everyone on my rides attended at least ASM Basic.  ASM Advanced is one of the prerequisites to become a Certified Road Guardian and certainly will Advance your knowledge base.  Even if I would not have completed the Advanced training in my quest to attain Certified Road Guardian recognition, I’ve gained a great deal of confidence and satisfaction knowing that I’m prepared in the event that I (again) come upon the scene of a motorcycle crash. Please give ASM training serious consideration.  In all likelihood, one or two bikers that you know or even have never met may be very grateful that you did.

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